Topics > Newcastle City Centre > Streets > City Road > Church of St Ann, City Road

Church of St Ann, City Road


St Ann's Church is located by City Road / Breamish Street in the Battlefield area of Newcastle. The parish church was built 1764-1768 for the Corporation of Newcastle and designed by William Newton.[1] It replaced a small chapel established here in the 14th/15th century.[2] Stone taken from the section of the Town Walls, which used to run alongside the Quayside, was used in the construction of the new church. It was consecrated by Bishop Trevor on Friday 2nd September 1768[3]. The church is a Grade I Listed building on the National Heritage List for England.

City Road Battlefield Churches and Cathedrals Grade I Listed William Newton (1730–1798) Byker Historic Buildings and Monuments in Newcastle 1768
from Newcastle libraries (flickr)
002963:St. Anne's Church City Road Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown c.1770

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Newcastle libraries (flickr)
008239:St. Anne's Church City Road Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown c.1912

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
St Ann's Church, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Tyneside

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from Newcastle libraries (flickr)
065423:St. Anne's Church City Road Newcastlwe upon Tyne Unknown 1990s

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from Newcastle libraries (flickr)
016494:St. Anne's Church City Road Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown 1968

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
William Newton (1730–1798)
  Co-Curate Page
William Newton (1730–1798)
- Overview About William Newton William Newton (1730–1798) was an architect who worked in Newcastle and the North East. William Newton (1730–1798) was an English architect who worked mainly in Newcastle ...
from Geograph (geograph)
St Ann's Church, Battlefield

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from Geograph (geograph)
The Church of St. Ann, City Road, NE1 - porch

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from Geograph (geograph)
St Ann, City Road, Newcastle

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from Geograph (geograph)
The Church of St. Ann, City Road, NE1

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from Geograph (geograph)
Tomb in the churchyard of The Church of St. Ann, City Road, NE1

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from http://www.twsitelines.info...
Tyne and Wear HER(9150): Byker, City Road, Church of St. Ann
- "Parish church. 1764-68 by William Newton for the Corporation of Newcastle. Sandstone ashlar; Lakeland slate roof. Rectangular with west porch and shallow east apse; west tower above nave. 3 steps ...

Added by
Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
St Ann's Church

Pinned by Pat Thomson
from Flickr (flickr)
St Ann's Church, City Road, Newcastle

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from Flickr (flickr)
St Ann's Church War Memorial

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from Flickr (flickr)
St Ann's Chapel, Newcastle

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from http://saintannbattlefield....
St Ann’s, Battlefield
- Official Website of the Church. Includes a section on history of the church and predecessor chapel. "...In 1334, Robert the Squire of Byker, granted to John Sergerstane, a hermit, a ...

Added by
Simon Cotterill
from https://sitelines.newcastle...
Tyne and Wear HER(1421): Byker, Chapel of St. Ann
- "In 1344 Robert of Byker granted to John Segerstane, a hermit, a plot of land in Byker 200 feet square, and a lane 20 feet wide extending from the plot ...

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Simon Cotterill

Comments

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  • Neil Morton on Jan. 16, 2022, 1:38 p.m.

    When did St Ann's move to Byker? I grew up in nearby Tarset Street, my son was christened at St Ann's, and we were always very clear that we were in the Battlefield (NE1) and that Byker (NE6) was on the east side of the Ouse Burn.

  • Simon Cotterill on Jan. 16, 2022, 2:55 p.m.

    Hi Neil,

    Thanks very much for sharing that and the page on St Ann's has been changed to say Battlefield instead of Byker. The St Ann's Website states Battlefield too. There wasn't anything about Battlefield in Co-Curate - so a new page has been added - anything you can add/amend on this would be very welcome! There seems to be a very limited amount of information about Battlefield, on the Web at least. https://co-curate.ncl.ac.uk/battlefield-newcastle/

  • Neil Morton on Jan. 17, 2022, 3:18 p.m.

    Simon
    Thanks for the prompt action. Battlefield itself is a bit of a mystery. In his book "A history of Newcastle on Tyne" Charleton said that the field within which St Ann's Church stood, "once known as Little St Ann's Close, is now called the Battlefield, but why is not known". He wrote in the 1880s.
    I've seen some claims, online, that the Battlefield name derived from the previous use of the area for dog-fighting, although. I've yet to see any convincing basis for this claim. The earliest mention of the name that I've seen was on a mid 19th century Ordnance Survey map and if the name arose during the early part of that century, you'd think Charleton would know why.

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List grade: 1
List number: 1355222
Tyne & Wear HER: 9150
Post code: NE1 6PY
Borough: Newcastle
Grid ref: NZ2606364276

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