Heathery Cleugh (parish)


Heathery Cleugh (sometimes called Heatherycleugh) is a parish in Upper Weardale in County Durham. It takes its name from the Heathery Cleugh (stream), which is a tributary of Killhope Burn. Heatherycleugh Bridge was built c.1810. The parish is unusual in that there is no substantive village of Heathery Cleugh. It was first formed a chapelry in the parish of Stanhope in 1825. The chapel of ease built at Copt Hill, in 1825 became a parish church in 1866, but the building had to be abandoned because of an encroaching quarry. The replacement parish church, the Church of St Thomas, Heatherycleugh was built in 1912 in Cowshill.  

"Heathery Cleugh is a parochial chapelry in Forest Quarter, forming the most western portion of Stanhope parish, and adjoining the parish of Alston in Cumberland. It is situated about three miles from St. John's Chapel, Weardale; and is bounded on the north by a portion of the county of Northumberland, on the west by Cumberland, on the south by Middleton-in-Teesdale, on the east by St. John's ciiapelry, and on the north-east by that of Rookhope. 

The Chapel is a plain stone structure, erected in 1825, as a chapel of ease, and will accommodate about 400 persons. It consists of a nave and chancel, with a spacious southern porch, and is lighted by double pointed windows. The pews are all open, the pulpit stands in the middle of the church, and the font is situated at the west end. The church is surrounded with a suitable burial ground, adjoining which is a commodious parsonage house and garden. The net income of the living, which is in the patronage of the rector of Stanhope, is stated at ????. Rev. George Thompson, incumbent." 

From History, Topography and Directory of Durham, W. Whellan , 1856

A later entry from the Directory:  

"Heathery Cleugh was formed a chapelry in 1825, in Forest Quarter, and in 1866 it was constituted a separate parish, forming the north-western boundary of the old parish of Stanhope, and adjoins the parish of Alston in Cumberland. It is bounded on the north by a portion of the county of Northumberland, on the west by Cumberland, on the south by Forest and Frith in Teesdale, on the east by St. John's Chapel, and on the north-west by Rookhope. This parish comprises the villages of Cowshill, Burtree Ford, and Wearhead, and the hamlets of Killhope, Lane Head, Burnhope, and Wellhope, with a population in 1891 of 1139.

"There is really no village of Heathery Cleugh, though there are a few cottages near the church. Cowshill is a village about half a mile from the church, and three miles west-north-west from St. John's Chapel, and is a posting-station for the coach which runs from Stanhope, the nearest railway station. Burtree Ford is another village adjoining Cowshill. Wearhead Village stands on the north bank of the Wear, at the confluence of the Killhope and Burnhope Water. It is two miles from St. John's Chapel, and is entered by an iron bridge erected in 1892. Here are chapels belonging to the Wesleyans and Primitives, several shops, and a post office. Lane Head is a hamlet half a mile west from the church, containing a Primitive and a Wesleyan chapel. The inhabitants of this district, which is wild and little cultivated, are principally engaged in the mines, making a livelihood by having a few acres of fell land upon which they graze a cow or a few sheep."

From History, Topography and Directory of Durham, W. Whellan , 1894

from http://books.google.co.uk/b...
History, Topography, and Directory of the County Palatine of Durham: Comprising a General Survey of the County, with Separate Historical, Statistical, and Descriptive Sketches of All the Towns, Boroughs, Ports, Parishes...(1856)
- Comprising a General Survey of the County, with Separate Historical, Statistical, and Descriptive Sketches of All the Towns, Boroughs, Ports, Parishes, Chapelries, Townships, Villages, Wards, and Manors. To which are ...

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Cowshill, County Durham
  Co-Curate Page
Cowshill, County Durham
- Overview Map Street View Cowshill is a village in Upper Weardale in County Durham, situated by Killhope Burn and within the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Cowshill is located ...
Church of St Thomas, Cowshill
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Church of St Thomas, Cowshill
- Overview Map Street View St. Thomas Church is the parish church of Heatherycleugh Parish, located in Cowshill in Weardale. St Thomas' was rebuilt here in 1912, the original church, built ...
from https://www.achurchnearyou....
St Thomas Heatherycleugh, Cowshill
- "St. Thomas Church is the parish church of Heatherycleugh Parish. There is actually no village of Heathery Cleugh. Rather, the church is located in the center of the village of ...

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Simon Cotterill
Lanehead, County Durham
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Lanehead, County Durham
- Overview About Lanehead Map Street View Lanehead is a village in County Durham, located by Killhope Burn, near the top of Weardale, and close to the county border with Cumbria. ...
Wearhead
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Wearhead
- Overview About Wearhead Map Wearhead is a picturesque village in County Durham, located at the start of Weardale where the River Wear is begins at the confluence of Burnhope Burn ...
Cornriggs, County Durham
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Cornriggs, County Durham
- Overview Map Street View Cornriggs is a small village in Upper Weardale in County Durham, located between Lanehead and the larger settlement of Cowshill. Cornriggs is located by Killhope Burn and ...
Heatherycleugh Bridge
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Heatherycleugh Bridge
- Overview Map Street View Heatherycleugh Bridge carries School Hill road (part of the A689) over the steep valley of the Heathery Cleugh (a stream), shortly before it flow into Killhope ...
Copthill, County Durham
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Copthill, County Durham
- Overview Map Street View Copthill is a hamlet immediately north of Cowshill in Upper Weardale in County Durham. In 1825 a chapel of ease to Stanhope was built at Copthill; this ...

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