Church of Holy Trinity, Sunderland


Holy Trinity opened in 1719 as the church for the newly created Parish of Sunderland. The church played a major part in the development of the town; housing the Town Hall, Magistrate's Court, a public library and even the town's fire engine.[1] Regular services ended in 1988 when the congregation fell, as the as the surrounding area declined. The building is now maintained by the Churches Conservation Trust. It is now a cultural venue; with the "Canny Space" aiming to reconnect the city with its heritage of the church and Old Sunderland, through storytelling, interpretation, innovative events and performances. The church is a Grade I listed building.[2Jack Crawford, the Sunderland-born hero of the battle of Camperdown (1797), is burried in the churchyard.

Holy Trinity is a church in Sunderland. It was opened in 1719 as the church for the newly created Parish of Sunderland.

It is a listed building and is one of the oldest buildings in the East End of Sunderland.

It is unknown who built the church, but what is known for sure is that Daniel Newcombe – who was appointed rector – and William Etty were involved in some of its design. A plaque marking its Grade I listed building status credits Etty as the designer. In its early years, the building was also home to the Select Vestrymen — in effect the town council — and the library and the mechanical fire pump.

The church is no longer used for regular worship. This grade 1 listed building is in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust, and is being restored with support from The Heritage Lottery Fund and other funders.

  • History
  • 1712 — Local merchants campaign for a new church to be built.
  • 1719 — First recorded baptisms, of Primus Barwick and Mary Whiton, on July 25.
  • 1719 — Church consecrated on September 5.
  • 1735 — Near-circular apse with Venetian window added by Daniel Newcombe, as the church initially had no chancel.[7]
  • 1803 — Gallery added, roof reconstructed by Thomas Wilson and windows re-glazed
  • 1838 — Memorial erected to Reverend Robert Gray, rector from 1819 to 1838.
  • 1856 — Clockface on tower added.[8]
  • 1842 – Gallery extension constructed, but later removed.
  • 1900 (circa) – Windows re-glazed for the second time.
  • 1936 – Organ built.
  • 1939–1945 – slight war damage
  • 1980s – building in need of expensive repairs
  • 1988 – cost of renovation and dwindling congregation cause the final service to be held on June 26, and church then closes a few days later.
Text from Wikipedia, available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (accessed: 03/02/2018).
Visit the page: Holy Trinity Church, Sunderland for references and further details. You can contribute to this article on Wikipedia.

from Flickr (flickr)
Church of Holy Trinity

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
Church of Holy Trinity

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Geograph (geograph)
Church of Holy Trinity

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Geograph (geograph)
The dreaming towers of Sunderland

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Geograph (geograph)
The Church of Holy Trinity, Sunderland

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Geograph (geograph)
Trinity Church

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from http://twsitelines.info/SMR...
Tyne and Wear HER(4421): Sunderland, Church of Holy Trinity
- "Since the old parish church of Bishopwearmouth was no longer large enough, in 1719 an Act of Parliament was obtained to establish the new parish of Sunderland. So it was ...

Added by
Simon Cotterill
from https://historicengland.org...
Church of Holy Trinity - List Entry
- "Redundant parish church. 1719. Possibly by William Etty. 1735 apse paid for by the incumbent, Daniel Newcome, extending original square-ended sanctuary; roof reconstructed by Thomas Wilson and west gallery added ...

Added by
Simon Cotterill
Jack Crawford (1775 - 1831)
  Co-Curate Page
Jack Crawford (1775 - 1831)
- Overview About Jack Crawford Jack Crawford was born on 22nd March 1775 at Thornhill’s Bank (now called Pottery Bank) in Sunderland. As a boy Jack was a keelman (working on ...
from https://commons.wikimedia.o...
Crawford's headstone at Holy Trinity graveyard in the East End.
- Photo by Superbfc, 2007, and licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Added by
Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
Church of the Holy Trinity.....Hendon........1719-2012

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
  Co-Curate Page
Churches Conservation Trust
- The Churches Conservation Trust is a charity which aims to protect historic churches at risk in England. https://www.visitchurches.org.uk/ Nationally the Trust cares for over 300 churches. The Trust was originally established ...
from Youtube (youtube)
Drone footage over Holy Trinity Church in Sunderland

Pinned by Pat Thomson
from Flickr (flickr)
Holy Trinity

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
Holy Trinity Church

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
B017919_N049_ID121441_FF_P001

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
B017919_N026_ID121441_FF_P001

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
B017919_N017_ID121441_FF_P001

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
B017919_N037_ID121441_FF_P001

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
B017919_N022_ID121441_FF_P001

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
B017919_N038_ID121441_FF_P001

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from https://www.visitchurches.o...
Holy Trinity, Sunderland
- ".....The Canny Space project will reconnect the city with its past by transforming Holy Trinity into a cultural venue that brings the heritage of the church and Old Sunderland to ...

Added by
Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
B017919_N020_ID121441_FF_P001

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
Sunderland...in the year 1699

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
B017919_N033_ID121441_FF_P001

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
Search The Scriptures

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
  Co-Curate Page
Church Street East, Sunderland

Comments

Add a comment or share a memory.

Login to add a comment. Sign-up if you don't already have an account.

ABOUT US

Co-Curate is a project which brings together online collections, museums, universities, schools and community groups to make and re-make stories and images from North East England and Cumbria. Co-Curate is a trans-disciplinary project that will open up 'official' museum and 'un-officia'l co-created community-based collections and archives through innovative collaborative approaches using social media and open archives/data.

LATEST SHARED RESOURCES