Cartington, Northumberland


Cartington is a village and civil parish in Northumberland, located about 2 miles north of Rothbury. Nearby villages are Thropton and Snitton to the south, and Lorbottle to the north. Village of Cartington: The ruins of Cartington Castle are prominent; the castle dates back to the 12th century, and was restored by Lord Armstrong in the 19th century. Today there is a farm and a few residential buildings, but during medieval times Cartington was a more extensive village.[1Parish of Cartington: the parish is sparsely populated and has extensive high moorland around the upper valley of the River Coquet. First World War practice tenches can still be seen in the moorland in the parish. The Cragside estate, built by Lord Armstrong is located in the south of the parish and is now a popular visitor attraction, maintained National Trust.

Cartington is a village and civil parish in Northumberland, England. It is about 11 miles (18 km) south west of Alnwick, and about 2 miles (3 km) north west of Rothbury, and has a population of 97. At the 2011 Census the population remained less than 100. Details were included in Callaly parish.

In 2010 the parish became involved in the hunt for Raoul Moat, a 37-year-old man from Newcastle upon Tyne, who was believed to have shot three people, killing one. Police discovered a makeshift camp, including a duvet, tent and sleeping bag, in a secluded area of land at Wagtail Farm, in the south of the parish.

Landmarks

Cartington Castle is a ruinous, partly restored medieval English castle. It is a Scheduled Ancient Monument and a Grade I listed building. Its first recorded owner was Ralph Fitzmain who held it in 1154. In the late 14th century a pele tower was built. In November 1515 Margaret, Queen of Scots, with her baby daughter Margaret stayed here on her journey from Harbottle Castle. Nearly ten years later, Lord Dacre stationed his troops here on a march north to join the Earl of Surrey. The castle continued to be occupied until finally abandoned in the 1860s. In 1887 Lord Armstrong partially restored the castle in order to prevent its complete disintegration.

In the south of the parish is Cragside, a country house maintained by the National Trust, that was the first house in the world to be lit by hydro-electric power.

Text from Wikipedia, available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (accessed: 30/06/2017).
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Topiary at Cartington

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'Posh' sign at Cartington

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Cartington Castle

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Topiary at Cartington

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View from Cartington

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St Helen's Well, Cartington

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Local History: Cartington
- "The parish of Cartington lies in central Northumberland and is almost entirely made up of high moorland. It stretches from the heights of Mount Pleasant in the east, across Cartington ...

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Cartington deserted medieval village (Cartington)
- "Cartington medieval village is first mentioned in old documents in the 13th century when a small share of land was held by John le Viscount. Following this, there are records ...

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Cragside
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Cragside
- Overview About Cragside Map Street View Cragside was the country house and estate of industrialist Lord William Armstrong and Lady Margaret Armstrong. It was the first house in the world ...
Snitter, Northumberland
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Snitter, Northumberland
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West Acre, Black Chirnells and Blue Chirnells

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