Sunderland Bridge, County Durham


Croxdale, St Bartholomew's Church Sunderland Bridge is both a bridge and a village in County Durham. The old bridge spans the River Wear about 5km south of Durham (and not to be confused with the bridge at the City of Sunderland in Tyne and Wear!). The village, which takes its name from the bridge, forms part of the civil parish of Croxdale and Hett, which also incorporates the village of Croxdale and hamlet of Hett.

Sunderland Bridge is both a bridge and a village in County Durham, England, about 3 miles (4.8 km) south of Durham City. Both lie close to the confluence of the River Wear and River Browney.

The village

The village forms part of the civil parish of Croxdale and Hett, within the unitary district of County Durham. Local government responsibilities are shared between parish and district councils.

The bridge

Sunderland Bridge originally carried the Great North Road (A1) across the River Wear, and probably dates back to the 14th century. It is built of dressed sandstone with four semicircular arches. The bridge has undergone several rebuilds, with the end arches being rebuilt in 1770, the parapets widened in 1822, and new end walls built in the 19th century. It is a grade I listed structure.

When a new bridge was needed as the existing bridge was not wide enough to cope with traffic, Croxdale Bridge was constructed to the east of the existing bridge. The A1 at this point was later re-designated as the A167, and Croxdale Bridge continues to carry this road.

Sunderland Bridge now carries very little road traffic after Durham County Council closed off the old route of the Great North Road at local request. It allows access to the private Croxdale estate and a sewage works. The bridge also forms part of the Weardale Way long distance footpath. The bridge straddles the parishes of Brandon and Byshottles and Croxdale and Hett.

Text from Wikipedia, available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (accessed: 07/06/2017).
Visit the page: Sunderland Bridge, County Durham for references and further details. You can contribute to this article on Wikipedia.

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Summerhouse at Sunderland Bridge

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Sunderland Bridge over the River Wear near Durham City
- Sunderland Bridge over the River Wear near Durham City, taken by Peter Hughes on Saturday 30 June 2007. The photo is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 ...

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Simon Cotterill
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River Wear in flood, Croxdale

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Minor road entering Sunderland Bridge

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Croxdale, St Bartholomew's Church

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23 - Durham and Home Once More

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Sunderland Bridge Gauging Station

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River Wear
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River Wear
- Overview Geology Course Tributaries Industrial History The Wear is a major river in County Durham. It rises in the East Penines at Wearhead at the confluence of Burnhope Burn and ...
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bridge

Pinned by Pat Thomson
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River Wear

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river

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Anthony Salvin (1799 -1881)
- Overview About Anthony Salvin Anthony Salvin, born in Sunderland Bridge in 1779, was an architect who developed an expertise in restoring medieval buildings, castles and country houses, as well as building ...

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