Pilgrim Street Gate


Carliol Tower

Pilgrim Street GateThis gate in the Town Wall was part the defences of Newcastle built in 1280. It stood at the north end of Pilgrim Street and was one of the main entrances to Newcastle in Medieval times. The tower was crenellated (built with battlements) with two storeys; with an upper room over a rib-vaulted passage, with a barbican on the north side. In 1827 Eneas Mackenzie wrote: "This gate was a remarkably strong, clumsy, and gloomy building, and, after the defence of the walls became unnecessary, a very great nuisance; the arch being so low as both to obstruct the passage of waggons, and the free circulation of the air into the town. In 1716, it was repaired and beautified by the Joiners' Company, whose hall was above the gate; and in 1771, convenient foot-passages were opened out on each side: but in 1802, the whole fabric was demolished. The workmen, on this occasion, found a cannon-ball in the wall, about a yard below the battlement of the old gate, which weighed more than 22 lb. Allowing for waste, this had probably been a 24 pounder, fired during the siege of the town in 1644, when this gate was so gallantly defended. The whole of the town wall between Newgate and Pilgrim Street has just been pulled down, and the stones employed in forming the common sewer for Blackett Street."

from Newcastle libraries (flickr)
b099:Pilgrim Street Gate engraving J. Fittler and E. Edwards 1786

source Pinned by
Simon Cotterill
from http://twsitelines.info/SMR...
Tyne and Wear HER(1549): Newcastle town wall, Pilgrim Street Gate
- "This gate stood at the north end of Pilgrim Street. It was a crenellated tower of two storeys, i.e. an upper room over a rib-vaulted passage, with a barbican ...

Added by
Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
Plan of Newcstle upon Tyne showing path of Town Wall with gates and towers

source Pinned by
Simon Cotterill
  from Simon Cotterill (Co-Curate Page)
Siege of Newcastle, 1644
- 3rd February1644: start of the Siege of Newcastle, which lasted until 19th October 1644, when the Scottish Covenanters took the city.
from Flickr (flickr)
Image taken from page 583 of 'The Local Historian's Table Book of remarkable occurrences, historical facts, traditions, legendary and descriptive ballads, connected with the Counties of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland, and Durham. Historical Division.

source Pinned by
Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
Image taken from page 511 of 'Allan's Illustrated Edition of Tyneside Songs and Readings. With lives, portraits, and autographs of the writers, and notes on the songs. Revised edition'

source Pinned by
Simon Cotterill

Comments

Add a comment or share a memory.

Login to add a comment. You can login with Twitter, Google, Co-Curate or Newcastle University accounts.

ABOUT US

Co-Curate is a project which brings together online collections, museums, universities, schools and community groups to make and re-make stories and images from North East England. Co-Curate is a trans-disciplinary project that will open up 'official' museum and 'un-officia'l co-created community-based collections and archives through innovative collaborative approaches using social media and open archives/data.

LATEST SHARED RESOURCES