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Church of St Edmund


St Edmund's Church is located on Front Street in Sedgefield. The parish church dates from c.1254, with later additions, with it's tower added in the 19th century. St Edmund's Church is a Grade I listed building on the National Heritage List for England.

The Church of St Edmund is a Church of England parish church in Sedgefield, County Durham. The church is a grade I listed building and dates from the 13th century.

History

The parish of Sedgefield was created by Cutheard of Lindisfarne during his time as Bishop of Lindisfarne (between 900 and 915). The first church was likely made of wood and this was replaced with a stone church by the Normans.

From 1246 to 1256, the current church was built. The church is dedicated to Edmund of Abingdon, a former Archbishop of Canterbury who died in 1240 (shortly before the church was built). There have been a number of additions to the building: in c.1290 transepts and a chancel were added; c.1490 a tower was added; in the 19th century a porch was added; and a vestry and organ chamber were added in 1913.

On 9 January 1968, the church was designated a grade I listed building.

Present day

Today, the Church of St Edmund is part of the Benefice of Upper Skerne in the Archdeaconry of Durham of the Diocese of Durham. The church stands in the Central tradition of the Church of England.

Notable clergy

  • George Howe, later Archdeacon of Westmorland and Furness, served as Rector of the parish from 1985 to 1991
Text from Wikipedia, available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (accessed: 13/02/2022).
Visit the page: Church of St Edmund, Sedgefield for references and further details. You can contribute to this article on Wikipedia.
Sedgefield Churches and Cathedrals Historic Buildings and Monuments in Sedgefield Grade I Listed
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St. Edmunds Church, Sedgefield

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Sedgefield, St Edmund: south side

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St Edmund's Church, Sedgefield

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from https://historicengland.org...
CHURCH OF ST EDMUND - Sedgfield - List Entry
- "Parish church. Circa 1254 aisled nave; c.1290 transepts and chancel; c.1490 tower; C19 porch; north vestry and organ chamber of 1913. Dressed and rubble masonry with graduated green ...

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Simon Cotterill
from Geograph (geograph)
Font in St Edmund's church

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from Geograph (geograph)
Woodwork in St Edmund's church

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from Geograph (geograph)
Shops on south side of Front Street, Sedgefield

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from Geograph (geograph)
Sedgefield: Shrove Tuesday ball game sculpture

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from Geograph (geograph)
St Edmund's Church, Sedgefield

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from Geograph (geograph)
St Edmunds Church at Sedgefield

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from Geograph (geograph)
Tower, St Edmund's Church

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from Geograph (geograph)
St. Edmund's Church

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from Geograph (geograph)
St Edmund's Church, Sedgefield

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from Geograph (geograph)
East window of St Edmund's

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from http://www.upperskerne.org....
St Edmund’s Church, Sedgefield
- "The parish of Sedgefield was founded by Bishop Cutheard sometime between AD 900 and AD 915, and a wooden church would have been built. With the coming of the Normans ...

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Simon Cotterill
from http://www.friendsofstedmun...
Friends of St Edmunds Church Sedgefield
- "Everyone in Sedgefield benefits from the Church – even if it’s just to check the time on the tower clock. St Edmund’s is a magnificent building that characterises Sedgefield ...

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Simon Cotterill

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List grade: 1
List number: 1121482
Wikipedia: Church of St Edmu...
County: County Durham
Grid ref: NZ3567928827

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