Chares


Chares is a Geordie word used for the narrow alley-ways in Newcastle. There used to be about 20 chares which led back from the Quayside in the medieval town (Dark Chare, Grindon Chare, Blue Anchor Chare, Peppercorn Chare, Palester Chare, Colvin's Chare, Hornsby Chare, Plumber Chare, Fenwick's Chare, Broad Garth, Peacock Chare, Trinity Chare, Rewcastle Chare, Broad Chare, Spicer Lane, Burn Bank, Byker Chare, Cock's Chare and Love Lane). The name was also applied to narrow lanes in different parts of the city and other parts of Northumberland.

On the Quayside, they are thought to have arisen from wooden piers built out into the river, between which rubbish was dumped and houses built on the reclaimed land. The buildings alongside the chares were crowded and unpleasant. Many were destroyed in the Great Fire of 1854." (Andrew Curtis, 2010)

Cox Chare

from http://twsitelines.info/SMR...
Tyne and Wear HER(10487): Newcastle, Quayside, Broad Garth
- "There were no minor streets or chares running off the Quayside before 1376, although the word "Key" is used four times from 1332 to 1366. From Sandhill to Sandgate there ...

Added by
Simon Cotterill
from https://en.wikipedia.org/wi...
Chare
- "A chare, in the dialect of North-east England, is a narrow medieval street or alley. Chares and much of the layout of Newcastle's Quayside date from medieval times. At ...

Added by
Simon Cotterill
from Keelman's Hospital from Cox Chare
Keelman's Hospital from Cox Chare
- "Cox Chare is now a road which runs from Pandon to the Quayside, to the east of the Law Courts...Chares is a Geordie word used for the narrow alley-ways ...

Added by
Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
Image taken from page 295 of 'The Local Historian's Table Book of remarkable occurrences, historical facts, traditions, legendary and descriptive ballads, connected with the Counties of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland, and Durham. Historical Division.

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
Image taken from page 47 of 'The Local Historian's Table Book of remarkable occurrences, historical facts, traditions, legendary and descriptive ballads, connected with the Counties of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland, and Durham. Historical Division.

Pinned by Simon Cotterill

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