Sunderland Minster


The Minster Church of St Michael and All Angels and St Benedict Biscop (commonly referred to as 'Sunderland Minster') is located on Church Lane, in the centre of Sunderland. It was originally the parish church of Bishopwearmouth and called the Church of  St Michael and All Angels. It was renamed as a Minster in 1998, in recognition of Sunderland being granted city status in 1992. Benedict Biscop was adopted as the patron saint of Sunderland in 2004, and later added to the name of the minster. It is thought that there has been a church on this site since Anglo Saxon times. Parts of the present church date from medieval times, but it was largely rebuilt and extended in the 19th and early/mid 20th century - the church tower c1807, the transepts 1849-50 by John Dobson; and nave rebuilt and widened 1933-5 by WD Caroe.[1] The church is a Grade II* listed building.

The Minster Church of St Michael and All Angels and St Benedict Biscop (commonly known as Sunderland Minster) is a church in Sunderland city centre, England. It was known as St Michael's Church, serving the parish of Bishopwearmouth, but was renamed on 11 January 1998 in recognition of Sunderland's city status. In May 2007 the Minster ceased to act as the parish church of Bishopwearmouth. It is one of the Greater Churches.

History

A church dedicated to St Michael has stood on this site for over a thousand years. For most of that time, it has been known as ‘Bishopwearmouth Parish Church’.

The parish of Bishopwearmouth, south of the River Wear was founded in around 940AD, with an original stone church being built shortly afterwards. The first evidence of a church on the site arose in a 1930s excavation when Saxon stones were found. Due to colliery subsidence, the church was virtually re-built beyond recognition in the early 20th century.

In 1998, following the grant of City status, the church was redesignated as ‘Sunderland Minster’: the second Minster church in England since the Reformation (following Dewsbury Minster in 1994).

In May 2007, with the adoption of Benedict Biscop as Sunderland’s Patron Saint, the church was redesignated as an Extra Parochial Place with the addition of St Benedict Biscop in its title.

It is a Grade II* listed building.

Role of the Minster

Until May 2007 the team of ministers carried out traditional parish duties as well as serving the city by hosting services of remembrance, providing chaplaincies for the retail and industrial workforces in the city centre, as well as being used by the University chaplaincy. It continues to play host to special services and worship events for the whole city, as it did for many years as Bishopwearmouth Parish Church. In 2007 the Minster ended its parish role, and these functions were transferred to the Parish Churches of St Nicholas and St Ignatius. Since then the Minster describes itself as "A church for the whole City".

Text from Wikipedia, available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (accessed: 24/08/2017).
Visit the page: Sunderland Minster for references and further details. You can contribute to this article on Wikipedia.

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Bishopwearmouth Green, Sunderland

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Sunderland Minster

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Sunderland Minster

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Low Row, Sunderland

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Benedict Biscop, Saint (628-690 AD)
  Co-Curate Page
Benedict Biscop, Saint (628-690 AD)
- Overview About Benedict Biscop   Benedict Biscop (pronounced "bishop" ) (c. 628 – 690), also known as Biscop Baducing, was an Anglo-Saxon abbot and founder of Monkwearmouth-Jarrow Priory (where he ...
from https://historicengland.org...
CHURCH OF ST MICHAEL - Sunderland - List Entry
- "Bishopwearmouth parish church. Medieval chancel largely reconstructed; tower c1807; transepts 1849-50 by John Dobson; nave rebuilt with double aisles 1933-5 by WD Caroe; outer aisles partitioned and floors inserted in ...

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from http://www.twsitelines.info...
Tyne and Wear HER(161): Bishopwearmouth, Church of St. Michael
- "A pre-Conquest church here has been suggested on the basis of an early documentary reference to South Wearmouth, supposed Saxon stones found on the site, the appearance of the tower ...

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