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History of Schools in Wreay


The Chapel of Wreay had fallen into neglect after the Reformation; the "Twelve Men of Wreay" converted the chapel into a schoolhouse (for boys only). Like many other schools at the time there was a tradition of cock-fighting at Wreay School, with a silver cock-fighting bell endowed in 1655. 

Summary of Wraey Grammar School, based on Nicholas Carlisle's "A Concise Description of the Endowed Grammar Schools in England and Wales" published in 1818 (c/o Wikipedia article):

The chapel of Wreay was founded by a petition to Edward Rainbow, Bishop of Carlisle. A schoolhouse was built in 1751. Twelve men acted as trustees to appoint the Master. John Brown Esq. of Melguards bequeathed only £200, but it was the largest donation, with which his Losh heirs purchased land. A Cocks and Bell tradition marched two teams to Wreay Green to celebrate hat throws for the end of year ceremonies.

Extract from: The Worthies of Cumberland ...by Henry Lonsdale, 1873.
pp 222-3. part of the entry for "Sara Losh of Woodside"

Miss Losh built an infants school at Wreay, and placed a worthy dame in charge of it. This school fell into disuse when the new Educational Act made it compulsory for girls and boys to be educated under the same roof. And to meet this view, she erected an entirely new school in 1830 - being aided to the extent of £100, bequeathed by her aunt, Margaret Losh. Miss Losh carried her generosity further, and endowed the school with thirty acres of land, the rents or proceeds derived from which to be applied to the education of poor children in the adjoining townships. This endowment is held in trust by the TWELVE Men of Wreay, with whom rests the appointment of the schoolmaster, and the distribution of the Lowthian trusts etc. She also erected a cottage for the schoolmaster on the model of one discovered at Pompeii, recorded on the Ordnance Survey maps of Cumberland as the “Pompeian Cottage”. The cost of erecting High Hesket School was mainly defrayed by Miss Losh, and the same may be said of Upperby School.
Wreay Wreay Cock-fighting Bell Wreay CofE Primary School Sarah Losh (1785 - 1853)
Wreay Cock-fighting Bell
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Wreay Cock-fighting Bell
- In the distant past small silver bells were sometimes given as prizes for cock-fights held in schools. In England and Scotland, some schoolmasters supplemented their incomes with payments from boys ...
Sarah Losh (1785 - 1853)
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Sarah Losh (1785 - 1853)
- Overview About Sarah Losh Sarah Losh was an architect and designer from Wreay in Cumbria. She designed St Mary's Church and other buildings in Wreay. Sadly, none of her papers ...
Wreay CofE Primary School
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Wreay CofE Primary School
- Overview Map Street View Wreay Church of England Primary School is a voluntary controlled school in the village of Wreay, located close to St Mary's Church. The school has roughly ...

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