Dawdon Colliery (1907-1991)


Dawdon Colliery was sunk in 1907 by the Sixth Marquess of Londonderry, when the workings at his Seaham Colliery became increasingly costly to work from the old shafts, as the mine pushed out to the south-east. The new shafts for Dawdon Colliery were sunk at the coast on a rocky promontory known as Noses Point, near Dawdon. At that time Dawdon was a small village of 83 houses. Dawdon was extended by Londonderry, with the building of 20 streets of new housing to accommodate the rapidly growing workforce at the colliery. By 1910 the 3,300 miners at Dawdon Colliery were producing 1 million tons of hand-hewed coal per year. In 1930 the numbers employed at the colliery reached their peak at 3,798 (3,163 working below ground and 635 working on the surface).[1] Dawdon Colliery closed on the 25th of July, 1991.
from Beamish (flickr)
Dawdon Colliery Modernisation - two miners on the Loco haulage road.

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Beamish (flickr)
Dawdon Colliery Modernisation - view of Dawdon Pool from the Teresa Tower.

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Beamish (flickr)
Dawdon Colliery Modernisation - 100 hp locomotive on loco drift.

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Beamish (flickr)
Dawdon Colliery Modernisation - view of Dawdon from Theresa Tower

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Beamish (flickr)
Dawdon Colliery Modernisation - new washery plant.

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Beamish (flickr)
Dawdon Colliery Modernisation - Loco road bypass.

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Beamish (flickr)
Dawdon Colliery Modernisation - conveyor system to new washery plant.

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Beamish (flickr)
Dawdon Colliery Modernisation - Castlereagh shaft

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Beamish (flickr)
Dawdon Colliery Modernisation - erection of Castlereagh winder

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Beamish (flickr)
Dawdon Colliery Modernisation - personnel installing south side skip.

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Beamish (flickr)
Dawdon Colliery Modernisation - Castelreagh Tower winder

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Beamish (flickr)
Dawdon Colliery Modernisation - middle /4 seam - plough installation.

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
Dawdon Colliery Reclamation and Development sign. Aug 1998

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Youtube (youtube)
dawdon colliery

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Youtube (youtube)
Dawdon A Life Underground 1974 Part 1

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Youtube (youtube)
Dawdon A Life Underground 1974 Part 2

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Youtube (youtube)
Dawdon A Life Underground 1974 Part 3

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Youtube (youtube)
Dawdon A Life Underground 1974 Part 4

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Youtube (youtube)
end of dawdon collery

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Youtube (youtube)
Dawdon - The Final Countdown

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
Seaham
  Co-Curate Page
Seaham
- Overview About Seaham Map Street View Seaham is a town on the east coast in County Durham. There has been settlement at Seaham since at least early medieval times; the ...
from Youtube (youtube)
Tyne Tees TV - Seaham Colliery Demolition

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from http://www.dmm.org.uk/colli...
Dawdon Colliery

Added by
Simon Cotterill
from Geograph (geograph)
Dawdon's Fossil Tree

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Geograph (geograph)
Colliery waste on Blast Beach

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Geograph (geograph)
Looking to the south from Nose's point along Blast Beach

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Geograph (geograph)
Wind shelter and visitor information, Nose's Point

Pinned by Simon Cotterill

Comments

Add a comment or share a memory.

Login to add a comment. Sign-up if you don't already have an account.

ABOUT US

Co-Curate is a project which brings together online collections, museums, universities, schools and community groups to make and re-make stories and images from North East England and Cumbria. Co-Curate is a trans-disciplinary project that will open up 'official' museum and 'un-officia'l co-created community-based collections and archives through innovative collaborative approaches using social media and open archives/data.

LATEST SHARED RESOURCES