List number: 1354990
List grade: 2*
Tyne & Wear HER: 7292
Grid ref: NZ3530266941

Accumulator Tower, Albert Edward Dock


The hydraulic accumulator tower is located in what today is the Royal Quays Marina in North Shields. The 2 story tower was built in 1882 for the Tyne Improvement Commissioners, and used hydraulic power to open the lock gates for what was then the Albert Edward Dock. This is a surviving example on the River Tyne of hydraulic machinery, first developed at Newcastle the 1840s by William Armstrong.[1] The Newcastle Swing Bridge (1876) is an earlier example of hydraulic machinery on the Tyne, also built by Armstrong. The Accumulator Tower at Albert Edward Dock is a Grade II* Listed building.

from Geograph (geograph)
Albert Edward Dock - Accumulator Tower

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Geograph (geograph)
Royal Quays Marina

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from https://historicengland.org...
ACCUMULATOR TOWER IN ALBERT EDWARD DOCK - List Entry
- "Accumulator tower in Albert Edward Dock G.V. II* Hydraulic accumulator tower. 1882 for Tyne Improvement Commissioners. Engineers Ure and Messent. Rock-faced sandstone with quoins, ashlar plinth coping and dressings ...

Added by
Simon Cotterill
from http://www.twsitelines.info...
Tyne and Wear HER(7292): North Shields, Albert Edward Dock, accumulator tower
- "Hydraulic accumulator tower. Used hydraulic power to open the lock gates. 1882 for Tyne Improvement Commissioners. Engineers Ure and Messent. Rock-faced sanstone with quoins, ashlar plinth coping and dressings. Welsh ...

Added by
Simon Cotterill

Comments

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  • Maz on July 20, 2018, 12:11 a.m.

    Simon - am I not right in saying its not the only hydraulic equipment on the Tyne, what about the Swing Bridge with hydraulics also invented by Armstrong? 'The hydraulic power still used to move the bridge is today derived from electrically driven pumps. These feed a hydraulic accumulator sunk into a 60 foot (18 m) shaft below the bridge; the water is then released under pressure which runs the machinery to turn the bridge. The mechanism used for this is still the same machinery originally installed by Armstrong.[1]' - Wikipedia. Seeing an item on the news recently showing fantastic workings of the Swing Bridge , prompted me to google the information above, seemingly disputing that the accumulator is the only working hydraulics on the Tyne

    • Simon Cotterill on July 20, 2018, 9:37 a.m.

      Hi Maz,

      Thanks so much for your comment. Yes, you are absolutely right about the swing bridge. I've reworded the description to clarify that the Accumulator Tower is a surviving example on the River Tyne of hydraulic machinery (source Sitelines HER record). The description now mentions the swing bridge. Thanks for helping improve Co-Curate. All the best, Simon

      • Simon Cotterill on July 20, 2018, 10:12 a.m.

        Will also feed that back to Sitelines & Historic England which mention it as the only surviving example. Perhaps there is a point of clarification regarding the type of hydrolic machinery. List entry:
        https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1354990

  • Maz on July 20, 2018, 12:13 p.m.

    That's brilliant Simon. You have taken my comment in the way which I intended and with good grace; so promptly too. May I continue to use your website please? It is fascinating.

  • Simon Cotterill on July 20, 2018, 1:06 p.m.

    Yes, absolutely. The more people who use/contribute the better! Thanks for your interest.

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