4 - Legs Cross Hill

  • Description

    ‘The Road to Albalanda’ By Samuel Tuke Richardson of Darlington c.1896 ‘Coming to a very steep hill the nags were allowed to walk whilst the coachman pointed out the well known landmark of Legs Cross, a stone pillar with large stones at its base. Here King James of Scotland on one of his journeys to Darlington when on a visit to the Pease family reposed himself, observing in his rude scotch dialect that the view was wall-worth seeing, this no doubt gave the name to the castle of Walworth lying a few miles from Legs Cross. Many children were playing about the stone which they were rapidly wearing away with their small clothes; but having been warned off by the coachman in a stern voice & greatly intimidated by the guard producing the blunderbuss from the boot, Mrs de la Reynardez was enabled to take one of her rapid & graphic sketches of this interesting historical monument. Pursuing their way down Bildershaw Hill the team had to be somewhat hastily pulled up by reason of a jibbing horse in a coal cart which insisted upon occupying the whole of the Road’.
  • Owner

    Beamish Museum
  • Source

    Beamish (Flickr)
  • License

    What does this mean? All Rights Reserved (Seek permission to reuse)
  • Further information

    Link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/36275059@N02/9527482475/
    Resource type: Image
    Last modified: 6 years ago
    Viewed: 609 times
    Picture Taken: Unknown
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Co-Curate is a project which brings together online collections, museums, universities, schools and community groups to make and re-make stories and images from North East England and Cumbria. Co-Curate is a trans-disciplinary project that will open up 'official' museum and 'un-officia'l co-created community-based collections and archives through innovative collaborative approaches using social media and open archives/data.

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