List number: 1001049
List grade: 2
Wikipedia: Kirkharle Hall
Keys to the Past HER: N10507
Grid ref: NZ0129482860

Kirkharle Hall


Kirkharle Farm is the surviving east wing of Kirkharle Hall (initially built in c 1718, added to c 1755, and then partially demolished in 1836).

Kirkharle Hall was a country house at Kirkharle, Northumberland, England, the former seat of the Loraine family, now much reduced and in use as a farmhouse. The Hall is in the upper reaches of the Wansbeck valley; almost adjacent to the A696 road; west of Morpeth; and southeast of Kirkwhelpington.

History

Kirkharle name was first recorded, as Herle in 1177, and derives either from the Old English "Herela-lea" which means "Herela's Grove" or from the Old English "herg-lea" which means "temple-grove" a place of worship for the pre-Christian Angles. Other early forms included Kyrkeherle (c.1250), Kyrkherll (1346) and Kirkehirle (1428), the "kirk" element denoting a "church".

The Loraine Baronets acquired it by marriage the manor from the De Harles who owned it in the 14th century, and derived their name (literally "of Harle") from the village. Following its sale to a local farmer in the early 19th century the Hall was largely demolished. Only one wing was retained which was rebuilt as a farmhouse. It is a Grade II listed building.

Nearby stands a memorial stone erected in 1728 to replace an earlier memorial commemorating Robert Loraine who was killed by marauding Scots in 1483.

Among the quaint epitaphs in the church upon departed Loraines is the following:

Here lyes the Body of Richard Loraine, Esq., who was a proper handsome man of good sense and behaviour : he dy'd a Batcheler of an Appoplexy walking in a green field near London, October 26th, 1738, in the 38 Year of his Age.

The surrounding parkland was designed in the 18th century by Capability Brown who was born at Kirkharle and who began his career as a gardener in the park. The park is a Registered Historic Park Grade II.

The present owner has redeveloped the farm and its outbuildings to create Kirkharle Courtyard, a development incorporating historical, retail and craft centres.

Text from Wikipedia, available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (accessed: 16/02/2017).
Visit the page: Kirkharle Hall for references and further details. You can contribute to this article on Wikipedia.
 
 
from Flickr (flickr)
The birthplace of William 'Capability' Brown and the Serpentine Lake - Kirkharle Courtyard, Kirkwhelpington, Northumberland

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
The birthplace of William 'Capability' Brown and the Serpentine Lake - Kirkharle Courtyard, Kirkwhelpington, Northumberland

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Geograph (geograph)
Kirkharle Hall

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Geograph (geograph)
Kirkharle Courtyard and Farm

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from https://historicengland.org...
KIRKHARLE HALL - List Entry
- "....Kirkharle Farm (listed grade II) is the surviving east wing of Kirkharle Hall (initially built in c 1718, added to c 1755, and then partially demolished in 1836)...."

Added by
Simon Cotterill
from http://www.keystothepast.in...
Kirkharle Hall landscape park (Kirkwhelpington)
- "Kirkharle Hall landscape park was created by William Lorraine and Capability Brown in the 18th century. Capability Brown's first job was working on the Kirkharle estate. Part of the ...

Added by
Simon Cotterill
from Flickr (flickr)
Capability Brown, the Shakespeare of Gardening

Pinned by Simon Cotterill
from Geograph (geograph)
Kirkharle Farm

Pinned by Simon Cotterill

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