Brancepeth


Brancepeth is a village in County Durham, about 8km south-west of the city of Durham; it is also a civil parish. The village includes Brancepeth Castle, which was first built in 12th century by the Bulmers, a prominent Saxon family, and later belonged the Neville family, the Earls of Westmoreland.[1] The parish church of St Brandon's was also established in the 12th century. Brancepeth is part of a very large Conservation Area, which includes the Castle, Church and estate village of Brancepeth together with the planned parkland and associated farmland.[2]

Brancepeth is a village and civil parish in County Durham, in England. It is situated about 8 km from Durham on the A690 road between Durham and Weardale. The population of the civil parish taken at the 2011 census was 414.

Brancepeth Castle was until 1570 the fortress of the Neville Earls of Westmorland. The castle was extensively modified and rebuilt in the 19th century by Viscount Boyne (later Baron Brancepeth). It was later a military hospital.

St Brandon's Church had fine 17th century woodwork until it was destroyed in a major fire in 1998.

In 1924, Harry Colt laid out a golf course on the deer park which formed part of the estate surrounding the castle. A club house was created from the old coach house and stables and remains in use by Brancepeth Castle Golf Club. The 6400-yard, par 70 course is regarded as one of the finest in the north-east of England.

According to one story, the village's name is said to derive from "Brawn's Path". There is a legend that Brancepeth was once terrorized by an enormous brawn, which was eventually killed by a knight named Sir Roger de Ferie in 1208. A commemorative stone marks the traditional location of the brawn's death.

A more likely explanation is that it derives from "Brandon's Path", after St Brandon, the patron saint of the parish church.

Text from Wikipedia, available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (accessed: 22/05/2016).
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Brancepeth Church

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"The Village", Brancepeth

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Beamish at 40 - Frank Atkinson in the Stores

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Houses in Brancepeth Village

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Brancepeth Castle

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from http://www.durhamintime.org...
Brancepeth Archives & History Group
- "In 2006 a small group of people who share an interest in village history came together with the aim of recording the past and present history of Brancepeth Parish (which ...

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Simon Cotterill
from http://www.keystothepast.in...
Local History: Brancepeth
- "he village of Brancepeth lies to the south-west of Durham. The parish was once very large, including the villages of Brandon, Byshottles, Helmington Row, Tudhoe Stockley and Willington, as well ...

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from http://www.historyofparliam...
William Russell (1798-1850), of Brancepeth Castle, co. Dur.
- Biography of William Russell who was MP for County Durham (1828 - 1832) and Sheriff, co. Durham. 1841-1842.

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from Geograph (geograph)
Brandon Lane on the ridge between Brancepeth and New Brancepeth

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from http://www.durham.gov.uk/me...
Brancepeth Conservation Area Character Appraisal
- Detailed description of the Conservation Area, 2009. the document includes maps and history. The Brancepeth Conservation Area totals approximately 600 hectares and within its boundary are • 31 Grade II Listed ...

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Simon Cotterill
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Tudhoe Lodge

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S Brannigan - 8th DLI - Brancepeth (Wounded)

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