Hunstanworth (County Durham) - Local History

  • Description

    "The village of Hunstanworth lies in the very north of Durham close to the border with Northumberland. It is just to the south of Blanchland, the site of an important medieval monastery. It is close to a particularly beautiful stretch of the River Derwent. Sadly, no prehistoric remains have been found in this area. In fact the first records for the area date only 1291. However, the name of the village comes from the Old English for 'Hunstan's enclosed farm' suggesting that there must have been a settlement since at least the late Anglo-Saxon period. However, little survives of this early village as it was completely rebuilt in 1862-3....In the 18th century, as in much of the North Pennines, the area became dominated by lead mining. Although earlier lead mining is known in the Ramshaw valley, possibly by agents of the Duke of Buckingham in the 17th century and by the London Lead Company in the 18th century, the visible remains all relate to the 19th century mining of the valley by the Derwent Lead Mining Company...."
  • Owner

    Keys to the Past (Durham & Northumbria County Councils)
  • Source

    Local (Co-Curate)
  • License

    What does this mean? Unknown license check permission to reuse
  • Further information

    Link: http://www.keystothepast.info/article/10339/Site-Detailsx?PRN=D6837
    Resource type: Text/Website
    Added by: Simon Cotterill
    Last modified: 5 years, 2 months ago
    Viewed: 401 times
    Picture Taken: Unknown
  • Co-Curate tags

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