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Historical Account of Holywell, 1894


Extract from: JOHN ROBINSON (1894), ILLUSTRATED HANDBOOK TO THE RIVERS Tyne ,Blyth,& Wansbeck; ALSO A GUIDE TO TYNEMOUTH, CULLERCOATS, WHITLEY, MONKSEATON, ST. MARY'S ISLE, HARTLEY, SEATON DELAVAL, BLYTH, NEWBIGGIN, WITH THE LEGENDS AND TRADITIONS OF THE COAST; AND A Glance Guide to Newcastle.

THE HOLY WELL.

Holywell Village is pleasantly situated about one and a half miles from Earsdon, and on the banks of Hartley Burn ; it is a charming spot, and has an interesting history and legend associated with its well of water. In the early days of the 11th century, the monks of Tynemouth were possessed of many valuable relics; but the one they valued next to those of their own patron Saint and Martyr St. Oswin, was a piece of the shroud of St. Cuthbert. This used to be carried about the country occasionally when the monks went out on begging excursions; if a pious Saxon gave 'liberally he was allowed the privilege of looking upon the relic. One evening, as the mendicant monk was wearily wending his way back to the Priory with the holy relic in his charge, and passing through the village at the foot of Earsdon, he was run after by a young man, who informed him that his mother, who had been blind for some years, had expressed a belief that were her eyes to be washed with water in which the relic of St. Cuthbert had been dipped, she would recover her sight. The monk, pleased with the faith of the old woman, said her request would be granted, and asked for some water to be brought from the well close by; but to his surprise he could not get the relic wet to extract its healing virtues; he went and dipped it in the well itself, yet still the relic remained dry as before it was placed in the water. At last the monk perceived it was a miracle, and in a transport of joy drank of the water himself; instantly he was cured of along standing painful disease. The eyes of the old woman were washed with water from the well, and immediately regained her sight. Soon the story of the miracle spread far and near, and there was a continuous stream of pilgrims from all parts to reap the benefits from a use of the water in the Holy Well. The well has long been known— even in this sceptical age as being highly medicinal, and good for sore eyes ;it waters become a purple colour when galls are infused in it. Close at hand stand the old mansion house of the Bates' family; over its doorway is inscribed— " Medio ...ia Firma, 1656."

Earsdon < Robinson, 1894 > Seaton Delaval Hall

Holywell
from http://access.bl.uk/item/pd...
JOHN ROBINSON (1894), ILLUSTRATED HANDBOOK TO THE RIVERS Tyne , Blyth, & Wansbeck etc.
- JOHN ROBINSON (1894), ILLUSTRATED HANDBOOK TO THE RIVERS Tyne ,Blyth,& Wansbeck; ALSO A GUIDE TO TYNEMOUTH, CULLERCOATS, WHITLEY, MONKSEATON, ST. MARY'S ISLE, HARTLEY, SEATON DELAVAL, BLYTH, NEWBIGGIN, WITH THE ...

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Simon Cotterill

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