Emily Davison

  • Description

    Detailed referenced article. "Emily Wilding Davison (11 October 1872 – 8 June 1913) was a suffragette who fought for votes for women in the United Kingdom in the early twentieth century. A member of the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) and a militant fighter for her cause, she was arrested on nine occasions, went on hunger strike seven times and was force fed on forty-nine occasions. She died after being hit by King George V's horse Anmer at the 1913 Epsom Derby when she walked onto the track during the race. Davison grew up in a middle-class family, and studied at Royal Holloway College, London, and St Hugh's College, Oxford, before taking jobs as a teacher and governess. She joined the WSPU in November 1906 and became an officer of the organisation and a chief steward during marches. She soon became known in the organisation for her daring militant action; her tactics included breaking windows, throwing stones, setting fire to postboxes and, on three occasions, hiding overnight in the Palace of Westminster...."
  • Owner

    Wikimedia Commons
  • Source

    Local (Co-Curate)
  • License

    What does this mean? Unknown license check permission to reuse
  • Further information

    Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emily_Davison
    Resource type: Text/Website
    Added by: Simon Cotterill
    Last modified: 6 years, 4 months ago
    Viewed: 673 times
    Picture Taken: Unknown
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