Hatton Gallery


Hatton GalleryThe Hatton Gallery is located on Kings Road at Newcastle University. "Our painting collection includes works from the 14th century to the present day. Key pieces include work by Francis Bacon, Richard Hamilton, Palma Giovane, Thomas Bewick, Eduardo Paolozzi, Camillo Procaccini, Patrick Heron, William Roberts, Victor Pasmore and Richard Ansdell. Watercolours by Wyndham Lewis, Thomas Hair and Robert Jobling are also held. The Hatton stages a programme of historical, modern and contemporary art exhibitions, and events including artist and curator talks and family activities. We work closely with students from Newcastle University and exhibt their work on an annual basis." The gallery was founded in 1925 and named after Professor Richard Hatton, professor of what was at that time the King Edward VII School of Art, Armstrong College, Durham University. When Newcastle University was established he became Head of the Department of Fine Art. Kurt Schwitter’s work the 'Merz Barn Wall' was brought to the gallery in 1965 and incorprated into the fabric of the building. The gallery, as part of the Great North Museum, is managed for Newcastle University by Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums. NE1 7RU.

The Hatton Gallery is Newcastle University's art gallery in Newcastle upon Tyne, England. It is based in the University's Fine Art Building.

The Hatton Gallery closes in February 2016 for a £3.5 million redevelopment and will reopen in 2017.

History

The Hatton Gallery was founded in 1925, by the King Edward VII School of Art, Armstrong College, Durham University (Newcastle University's Department of Fine Art), in honour of Richard George Hatton, a professor at the School of Art.

Richard Hamilton's seminal Man, Machine and Motion was first exhibited at the Hatton in 1955 before travelling to the ICA, so the Hatton can claim to have been the birthplace of Pop Art.

In 1997, the University authorities voted to close down the gallery, but a widespread public campaign against the closure, leading to a £250,000 donation by Dame Catherine Cookson, ensured the survival of the gallery.

As part of the Great North Museum project, the gallery's future is secure. Unlike the university's other collections, the Hatton Gallery was not transferred into the Hancock, but remained in the Fine Art Building.

The Hatton Gallery closes on 27 February 2016 for a £3.5 million redevelopment and will reopen in September 2017.

Exhibitions

The permanent collection comprises over 3,500 works, from the 14th century onward – including paintings, sculptures, prints and drawings – and starring the Merzbarn, the only surviving Merz construction by Kurt Schwitters, which was rescued from a barn near Elterwater in 1965 and is now permanently installed in the gallery.

Other important artists represented in the collection include Francis Bacon, Victor Pasmore, William Roberts and Paolo di Giovanni, Palma Giovane, Richard Hamilton, Panayiotis Kalorkoti, Thomas Bewick, Eduardo Paolozzi, Camillo Procaccini, Patrick Heron and Richard Ansdell. Watercolours by Wyndham Lewis, Thomas Harrison Hair and Robert Jobling are also held.

Important exhibitions held in the gallery in recent years include No Socks: Kurt Schwitters and the Merzbarn (1999) and William Roberts (2004).

Other logos

Hatton Gallery logo.png|The old Hatton Gallery logo, prior to the rebranding as Great North Museum.

Text from Wikipedia, available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (accessed: 07/04/2016).
Visit the page: Hatton Gallery for references and further details. You can contribute to this article on Wikipedia.
from TWAM (youtube)
Installing the Victor Pasmore exhibition at the Hatton Gallery

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Reinterpreting Old Masters

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from TWAM (youtube)
Chris Stephens on Victor Pasmore

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from TWAM (flickr)
Ward C1, 1st Northern General Hospital during the First World War was housed in what is now the Hatton Gallery

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  from Simon Cotterill (Co-Curate Page)
Newcastle University
  from Simon Cotterill (Co-Curate Page)
Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums
  from Simon Cotterill (Co-Curate Page)
Thomas Bewick (1753-1828)
- Overview About Thomas Bewick Thomas Bewick (1753-1828). Bewick, the acclaimed wood engraver, artist and naturalist, was born in August 1753 at Cherryburn House, a small farm in the parish of ...
from http://www.geograph.org.uk/...
Entrance to the Fine Art Building from the Quadrangle
- "The building houses the School of Arts and Cultures, and the Hatton Gallery (now part of the Great North Museum) ". Photo by Andrew Curtis, 2010, and licensed for reuse under ...

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from http://www.twsitelines.info...
Tyne and Wear HER(9223): Newcastle, University Quadrangle, Fine Art Department
- "College of art. 1911 by W.H. Knowles for Armstrong College. Dark red brick with ashlar dressings; roof of plain tiles. Tudor style. L-plan. Basement and one storey with one ...

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from Flickr (flickr)
looking at images made by members of Newcastle's Iranian community

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Kurt Schwitters: Merzbarn wall

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Realtimelapse by John Topping

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from https://hattongallery.org.uk/
Hatton Gallery
- Official Website of the gallery.

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  from Simon Cotterill (Co-Curate Page)
Great North Museum: Hancock
- Overview About the Museum Map Street View The museum was established in 1884  to house the growing collections of the Natural History Society of Northumbria. It was named after John ...
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The Future of the Hatton Gallery

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